Lawrence and Reed master Mooloolaba

Tim Reed and Holly Lawrence took the Ironman 70.3 world titles in Mooloolaba, Australia. TriathlonWorld.com recaps an incredible day of racing down under.

| September 4, 2016 | NEWS

Tim Reed  | Tim Reed sprints to the line to take the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Mooloolaba, Sunshine Coast, Australia.

Tim Reed sprints to the line to take the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Mooloolaba, Sunshine Coast, Australia.

For years we’ve talked about how the Ironman 70.3 scene was going to look like ITU style racing. We got a bit of that flavor in 2007 and 2008 when Andy Potts and Terenzo Bozzone took the men’s championship, but since then the ITU worlds have seemed more like a shorter version of Kona.

That all changed today, on the men’s side anyway, as Tim Reed and Sebastian Kienle put on a show to entertain the world. The two came off the bike with 15 others, all within 31 seconds of each other, setting the stage for an amazing run.

The women’s race featured a dominant, almost lead-the-whole-way performance … just not by the athlete many had anticipated to play that role today as Holly Lawrence filled in for Daniela Ryf on the “dominate the day from the start” playbill.

 

Holly Lawrence | Holly Lawrence ... Ironman 70.3 world champion.

Holly Lawrence ... Ironman 70.3 world champion.

Photo >Fabian Fiedler / spomedis

Lawrence flies

All week long people in the know had been talking about Holly Lawrence, the Brit who now lives in California and has been ripping through 70.3 fields with seeming ease over the last few months. Those of us who missed her impressive Vineman 70.3 performance weren’t ready for the show she put on today.

Coming out of the water almost 30 seconds behind Lauren Brandon, Lawrence used a quick transition to start the bike just seconds behind the American. It didn’t take long for Lawrence to assert herself on the bike, powering along the flatter highway section of the course and actually opening up time on the chase group that had started the bike over 40 seconds behind her. In that group was an impressive who’s who of the sport: Daniela Ryf, Leanda Cave, Alicia Kaye, Magali Tisseyre, Anabel Luxford and Heather Wurtele were amongst that group that seemed ready to start gaining time on the lead duo.

It never happened, though. The move we all awaited from Ryf never materialized and the rest of the group wasn’t able to gain time on the fast-riding Lawrence. A slow-swimming Melissa Hauschildt worked her way up to the chase group, but once she was there she wasn’t able to make up much more time on Lawrence, either.

By the time she was off the bike Lawrence’s lead was almost four minutes on Brandon and just under five minutes on Wurtele and the rest of the gang, setting herself up for her first world championship.

The only woman who provided any sort of threat to Lawrence on the run was Hauschildt, who ran three minutes quicker, but still ended up two minutes short of her third Ironman 70.3 world title.

Wurtele would make it three years in a row on the podium here at the Ironman 70.3 World Championship.

Melissa Hauschildt | Melissa Hauschildt runs her way to second.

Melissa Hauschildt runs her way to second.

Photo >Kevin Mackinnon

Tim Reed  | Tim Reed is all smiles after taking the Ironman 70.3 World Championship.

Tim Reed is all smiles after taking the Ironman 70.3 World Championship.

Photo >Kevin Mackinnon

Reed rocks the sprint

The men’s race saw Josh Amberger set a new world champs swim record to start the day – his 21:56 swim split put him out in front of the race, a position he held early on the bike, too. Then the train pulled through … by 40 km in the German locomotives had pulled through as Andreas Dreitz and Sebastian Kienle (who had an impressive 24:14 swim) pushed at the front of the race, but they had some company. Up with them were Terenzo Bozzone, Tyler Butterfield, Nick Kastelein, the ageless Craig Alexander, Sam Appleton, Mark Bowstead, Maurice Clavel and Reed.

Which set things up for an exciting run. It didn’t take long for Kienle and Reed to separate themselves from the rest of the pack and the two went back and forth at the front of the race throughout the run, providing an incredibly exciting spectacle for the crowds on hand. Kienle surged shortly after the final turnaround with about 5 km of running to go, but couldn’t hold off Reed in the last 500 m of the run as the Aussie surged by and held on for a thrilling sprint to the line to take the title.

Switzerland’s Ruedi Wild flew through the run to take the bronze medal.

Ironman 70.3 World Championships | Men

  1. September 2016, Mooloolaba (Australien)

Platz

Name

Nation

Gesamt

1,9 km Swim

90 km Bike

21,1 km Run

1

Timothy Reed

AUS

3:44:14

22:53

2:06:12

1:11:03

2

Sebastian Kienle

GER

3:44:16

24:14

2:04:45

1:11:18

3

Ruedi Wild

SUI

3:44:40

22:47

2:06:28

1:11:07

4

Terenzo Bozzone

NZL

3:45:52

22:44

2:06:20

1:12:44

5

Sam Appleton

AUS

3:46:02

22:40

2:06:23

1:12:51

6

Nicholas Kastelein

AUS

3:46:21

22:43

2:06:41

1:12:46

7

Tim Don

GBR

3:46:32

22:51

2:06:37

1:12:57

8

Maurice Clavel

GER

3:46:47

22:53

2:06:18

1:13:39

9

Lionel Sanders

CAN

3:47:14

25:41

2:06:42

1:10:34

10

Craig Alexander

AUS

3:47:28

22:49

2:06:39

1:14:03

11

Andreas Dreitz

GER

3:48:16

23:20

2:06:36

1:15:18

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Ironman 70.3 World Championships | Women

  1. September 2016, Mooloolaba (Australia)

Platz

Name

Nation

Gesamt

1,9 km Swim

90 km Bike

21,1 km Run

1

Holly Lawrence

GBR

4:09:12

23:24

2:19:28

1:21:48

2

Melissa Hauschildt

AUS

4:11:09

26:46

2:21:06

1:18:43

3

Heather Wurtele

CAN

4:13:36

25:05

2:22:26

1:21:38

4

Daniela Ryf

SUI

4:14:09

24:12

2:23:47

1:21:19

5

Caroline Steffen

SUI

4:17:16

24:13

2:23:09

1:25:10

6

Annabel Luxford

AUS

4:17:26

24:11

2:23:44

1:24:58

7

Laura Philipp

GER

4:17:40

27:16

2:24:46

1:21:00

8

Alicia Kaye

USA

4:17:53

24:17

2:23:31

1:25:35

9

Radka Vodickova

CZE

4:18:17

24:10

2:26:51

1:22:37

10

Magali Tisseyre

CAN

4:18:19

24:16

2:23:49

1:25:36

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