Gomez makes history in Montreal

Javier Gomez took his 14th World Triathlon Series title at the inaugural ITU World Triathlon Montreal and also became the oldest every WTS champion.

| August 7, 2017 | NEWS

Photo >Kevin Mackinnon

Set in and around the Old Port of Montreal, WTS Montreal features a challenging course that takes in some tough climbs, cobblestones and, on this day, lots of wind, but none of that slowed Spain’s Javier Gomez one bit as he blasted through the run to become the oldest man to ever win a WTS event.

“I’m pretty proud of that,” Gomez said when asked how he felt about setting the “oldest” record. “In 2006, when I won my first world cup, I was one of the youngest to win a world cup and now I am the oldest. That means it’s been a long career and I’m pretty proud and happy.”

After a number of sprint events on the WTS circuit Gomez was happy to be back competing over more familiar territory.

“When I started with this sport Olympic (distance) was the only distance and it’s what I trained for all my life,” he said. “Its true that some sprints aren’t bad when they are on a tough course like Edmonton, but I was sick and I couldn’t do my best there, I was sixth. I recovered well from that race and I felt good.”

“Recovered well” would be the understatement of the day as Gomez certainly was the man with the best legs on the day. While people might see the race as having been decided on the run, in actual fact it was the bike that made the difference on the day.

It was pretty obvious from even before the start exactly how Jonathan Brownlee (GBR) and Richard Varga (SVK) planned to tackle the race in Montreal. Brownlee signalled to Varga and pointed to an empty spot on the start pontoon next to him and from the horn the Slovak hammered to the front with the Olympic silver medalist hot on his heels.

Richard Varga was already in the water starting the second loop as Jonathan Brownlee dove in right behind.

Richard Varga was already in the water starting the second loop as Jonathan Brownlee dove in right behind.

Photo >Kevin Mackinnon

Eventually the two would exit the water along with American Ben Kanute and Australian Aaron Royle and the four set off on the bike together.

Gomez was a bit behind out of the water and knew he needed to make a move early if he was to have any chance, being fully aware of the Brownlee and Varga breakaway approach.

“You know that can happen and that you have to swim very well,” Gomez said. “I struggled a little bit in the water and my swim wasn’t very good. I knew I needed a very good first transition and I didn’t make it, so I had to work very hard for one and a half laps. Luckily enough the legs were fine and I just gave everything to make it to the breakaway.”

“That was the key to the whole race. That first lap, we had to give everything to make it to the breakaway,” Gomez continued. “Luckily I was with Kristian Blummenfelt – he’s a great cyclist, really strong – and we both worked really hard together to make it. After that the guys worked very well to keep that gap to the fast runners and the race worked very well.”

The “guys” included one more – young American Seth Rider, 20, managed to come along with Blummenfelt and Gomez and stayed with the lead group for the duration of the bike.

While the lead over the huge chase pack that included those “fast” runners like Spain’s Mario Mola and Fernando Alonso, along with South African Richard Murray got up to over a minute at one point, by the end of the 40.5 km bike the gap was about 45 seconds. Murray and Mola spent a lot of time at the front of the group trying to keep the deficit to a minimum, which, in the end, proved to be too much for Mola.

“I wanted to keep the good momentum I had (after four straight WTS wins), but the guys in the front worked well,” Mola said after the race. “I emptied the tank on the bike. I tried to start fast on the run – I knew that I had to finish in the top eight for the race to be worth it, but halfway through the run my legs said ‘that’s enough, that’s all you have today.’ I got to the end with what I had left.”

Javier Gomez made his move to the front at the start of the second lap.

Javier Gomez made his move to the front at the start of the second lap.

Photo >Kevin Mackinnon

Once on the run Brownlee quickly moved to the front through the first lap, but Gomez started to pull away on the second loop of the four-loop run course that included one of the same challenge hills the athletes had ridden up. Brownlee started to drop back and Gomez steadily pulled away from Blummenfelt on each climb, eventually netting the Spaniard a 15 second win over the Norweigan. Murray would find his legs after struggling on the bike and run himself to a second bronze medal performance in two weeks after finishing in the same spot in Edmonton last weekend.

ITU World Triathlon Montreal | Men

August 6, 2017 | Montreal, Canada.

Name

Country

Total

1.5 km Swim

40.5 km Bike

10 km Run

1

Javier Gomez Noya

ESP

1:47:50

0:17:06

0:58:24

0:30:56

2

Kristian Blummenfelt

NOR

1:48:05

0:17:07

0:58:19

0:31:16

3

Richard Murray

RSA

1:48:42

0:17:54

0:58:32

0:30:51

4

Jonathan Brownlee

GBR

1:49:04

0:16:52

0:58:34

0:32:10

5

Raphael Montoya

FRA

1:49:11

0:17:00

0:59:21

0:31:19

6

Jelle Geens

BEL

1:49:11

0:17:26

0:59:00

0:31:21

7

Simon Viain

FRA

1:49:24

0:17:49

0:58:34

0:31:32

8

Ryan Sissons

NZL

1:49:29

0:17:42

0:58:44

0:31:36

9

Pierre Le Corre

FRA

1:49:33

0:16:59

0:59:26

0:31:42

10

Vicente Hernandez

ESP

1:49:37

0:17:32

0:58:51

0:31:46

11

Crisanto Grajales

MEX

1:49:40

0:17:51

0:58:34

0:31:45

12

Aaron Royle

AUS

1:49:42

0:16:56

0:58:31

0:32:49

13

Richard Varga

SVK

1:49:57

0:16:51

0:58:35

0:33:01

14

Mario Mola

ESP

1:50:00

0:17:46

0:58:40

0:32:10

15

Shachar Sagiv

ISR

1:50:01

0:17:48

0:58:36

0:32:14

16

Dorian Coninx

FRA

1:50:09

0:17:00

0:59:24

0:32:21

17

Luke Willian

AUS

1:50:10

0:17:37

0:58:50

0:32:16

18

Gordon Benson

GBR

1:50:15

0:17:22

0:59:00

0:32:17

19

Andreas Schilling

DEN

1:50:17

0:17:43

0:58:28

0:32:36

20

Jonas Schomburg

ITU

1:50:21

0:17:08

0:59:19

0:32:27

21

Lukas Hollaus

AUT

1:50:22

0:17:57

0:58:29

0:32:25

22

Tony Dodds

NZL

1:50:26

0:17:20

0:59:07

0:32:29

23

Ben Kanute

USA

1:50:27

0:16:54

0:58:26

0:33:36

24

Russell White

IRL

1:50:36

0:17:28

0:58:57

0:32:45

25

Gustav Iden

NOR

1:50:37

0:18:02

0:58:21

0:32:48

26

Irving Perez

MEX

1:50:40

0:17:09

0:59:21

0:32:43

27

Adrien Briffod

SUI

1:51:23

0:17:39

0:58:50

0:33:31

28

David Mendoza

MEX

1:51:43

0:17:46

0:58:40

0:33:40

29

Alexis Lepage

CAN

1:51:48

0:17:13

0:59:15

0:33:51

30

Dmitry Polyanskiy

RUS

1:51:59

0:17:24

0:59:06

0:33:55

31

Fernando Alarza

ESP

1:52:03

0:17:58

1:00:17

0:32:18

32

Jumpei Furuya

JPN

1:52:15

0:17:29

0:59:02

0:34:16

33

Tyler Mislawchuk

CAN

1:52:20

0:17:10

0:59:19

0:34:25

34

Seth Rider

USA

1:52:52

0:16:57

0:58:28

0:35:58

35

Makoto Odakura

JPN

1:53:13

0:17:18

0:59:03

0:35:10

36

Shiruba Taniguchi

JPN

1:53:39

0:17:49

0:58:43

0:35:39

37

Hunter Lussi

USA

1:53:44

0:17:49

0:58:33

0:35:39

38

Joao Pereira

POR

1:53:58

0:17:15

0:59:08

0:36:01

39

Shogo Ishitsuka

JPN

1:54:03

0:17:06

0:59:23

0:36:05

40

Jacob Birtwhistle

AUS

1:55:15

0:18:00

0:59:06

0:36:43

41

Ryousuke Maeda

JPN

2:01:47

0:17:05

0:59:21

0:43:52

DNF

Grant Sheldon

GBR

DNF

0:17:58

0:00:00

0:00:00

DNF

Matthew McElroy

USA

DNF

0:18:00

0:00:00

0:00:00

DNF

Eric Lagerstrom

USA

DNF

0:17:47

0:00:00

0:00:00

DNF

Eli Hemming

USA

DNF

0:17:58

0:00:00

0:00:00

DNF

Declan Wilson

AUS

DNF

0:17:50

0:00:00

0:00:00

DNF

Ivan Ivanov

UKR

DNF

0:17:45

0:00:00

0:00:00

DNF

Sigurdur Orn Ragnarsson

ISL

DNF

0:18:00

0:00:00

0:00:00

LAP

Kenji Nener

AUS

LAP

0:17:34

0:00:00

0:00:00

LAP

Miguel Arraiolos

POR

LAP

0:17:59

0:00:00

0:00:00

LAP

Eder Mejia Muno

MEX

LAP

0:17:30

0:00:00

0:00:00

LAP

Mohamad Alsabbagh

SYR

LAP

0:17:56

0:00:00

0:00:00

Swipe me